10 Ways To Inspire Spirituality In Daily Life

Three influential aspects to spiritual identity and perspectives are:

  1. your personal big picture of reality and conscious connection to the ongoing nature of life and consciousness, a personal relationship with your sense of the divine may be part of this,
  2. the consistency and quality of mindful awareness and connection to your big picture at any given time, and finally
  3. the values you hold that resonate with your big picture view and how you put them into practice.

We all have our personal struggles. The battles we fight within are usually more crucial than the outcomes of the battles we fight in the world. A spiritual outlook provides an overriding perspctive that allows us to turn all of our challenges into character strengthening and while transcending conditioned ego attachments and aversions.

Personal daily reminders that help us reconnect with our higher Self has enormous benefits over time and with consistent practice. It is daily connecting with some element of mindfulness, connection to nature and a sense of transcendent sacredness that lifts and strengthens our spiritual identity. Taking responsibility for a progressive journey from within means utilising all occurrences for development and goodness consistently, but this takes inner strength and not falling into forgetfulness.

Here are some ways to go about daily life with some reminders and inspiration:

  1. Start and end the day with prayer or stillness …. developing a regular habit of quieting the mind and being still and present has many benefits physically, mentally and emotionally. Spiritually it is beneficial when it is done with a sense of sacred receptivity. Prayer or meditation or just a simple contemplation on reverence for life and existence are great ways to enter inner stillness. It is not about thinking nothing, but about letting go of the thoughts that occur, being present with the breath and the sense of letting everything fall away for a time. Physically it is best done in a comfortable but upright position, relaxing deeply into a wakeful sense of stillness. Try 3 minutes and build up to 20 minutes.
  2. Create your own alter – Enjoy finding some symbols or ornaments that mean something about reverence for life to you, holy or sacred symbols, images of teachers or loved ones. Include a candle or lamp to light during your daily stillness and whenever you feel the need to connect or initiate an atmosphere of sacredness. You can also burn incense or place fresh flowers regularly to offer in compassion for the greater good or to whatever form of sacred connection you identify with. Those who have a personal sense of the divine can cultivate loving devotion to a form or formless sense of the divine. Many religious practices do this, yet anyone can benefit to a dedicated space in their home. Such a focus can really connect the devotee to a deep sense of love, compassion, mercy and wisdom. Keep your alter simple, not too cluttered and know the true alter lies in the heart and deep in the consciousness.
  3. Create a daily active practice – an activity that can be done that is calming and connecting within yourself. Yoga, meditation, a walk, a special place in the garden or by a window to breath and stretch, a walk on the beach, forest or park, or a daily time to read only inspiring words of wisdom. This practice is your commitment to yourself for building a conscious connection within and to spirit. Inwardly you can combine prayer for others and the world, a meditation technique, or something you may already be doing. This is an active way to create a sense of peace and quietude within and around you. If it is done in a similar way most days, then it will develop a more powerful effect on cultivating the state of mind and connection you resonate with within.
  4. Meditate – is a key technique for billions of souls over thousands of years. Create you own private space, find a technique that suits your temperament and is most enjoyable aside from the longer term benefits. There is much information on how to meditate and further blogs on this site will delve more into various approaches for various types of people.
  5. Reminders during the day: Set your phone or watch timer to 3 key moments through the working day to stop for 6-10 breaths and reconnect consciously to your breath, inner stillness and maybe call to mind steps points 1,2 and 3 or a beautiful moment you have had recently.
  6. Use meal time to settle and refocus: Give thanks every time you eat and eat in silence.
  7. A random act of kindness – Set an intention each morning to do something to help or support someone or make their day better in any way. Do not seek recognition or thanks for it. Anonymous givings are great or doing something for a stranger. It can be different on different days and can be simple as consciously offering a smile to people. Privately review each evening what your act or acts of kindness were for the day.
  8. Purpose and meaning in what you do: Review your work and any major interests you spend time on outside work and actually write down the deepest purpose for doing it. It may take a small list of reasons to get there. If your ‘why’ is not something with deeper meaning than earning an income or achieving personal pleasure or something practical then keep writing down ideas on how you can transform your attitude and way of doing this task so it is a practice that develops important values or qualities for you or contributes to others. Consider ways these activities can assist others or add to your quality of life. Every role in society contributes in some way. Review your ‘why’s’ regularly so you reinforce a sense of serving some meaning and purpose in all the key things that you do.
  9. Practice gratitude and compassion. Have a daily time or a weekly time when you list or say quietly out loud at least 12 things you are grateful for. You can use the same ones regularly but try and include at least 2 or 3 new ones every few days. The more detail you give to each item the more powerful. Then consider 6 people or situations you are aware of that represent bad situations of stress or suffering and describing them to yourself until you have enhanced your empathy, understanding and urge to send out supportive and compassionate energy to them. If you only find time to do this weekly, you can still read over it daily near the start or end of each day.
  10. Promoting balance in your life is conducive to harmony and greater spiritual receptivity. This starts with our own states of mind and energy. Overcoming destructive inertia mobilises your energy into productive activity. However, some activities can become part of our stress or self-focus in a limiting way. They can then be transformed into conscious and positive action that brings you into balance and harmony.
    1. Destructive inertia: if there is something your are procrastinating about or have resistance to doing, then write down and commit to a timeline to get into action and move your energy on it.
    2. Transforming activity: obvious examples are an emotional reaction or a compulsive habit that no longer serves you or others. Write down an alternative behaviour that is more positive and supportive. It may be taking a few minutes out to breath, get into a positive space then re-engage with a solution oriented mind when stressed. It could be replacing a compulsive habit with something healthy and enjoyable. Attach a key word you can use to remind yourself and commit to 21 days of using your key word (saying it out loud through the day and having it written and visible in key areas). Then when that reaction or compulsive urge comes up, you can better remember to use that key word and go for the positive behaviour immediately. Remind yourself this is a 21 day commitment to help break that habit and transform your energy to improve overall quality of life and spiritual receptivity.Stocksy_txp8a69df0fGsf100_Small_1188669

What Is Spirituality?

spirituality      (spɪrɪtʃʊˈalɪti,spɪrɪtjʊˈalɪti/ )

noun :   the quality of being concerned with the human spirit or soul as opposed to material or physical things.

Religion (the institutions and established systems of belief in a divine power) and religious belief should cultivate spiritual experience. Spirituality itself is a subtle distinction to define and can be found in the simplest moments in life.

Not all spiritual practices or approaches are religious, such as yoga practiced with traditional authenticity and many techniques of meditation. Some sects of Buddhism can also be classed as non-religious. Many cultures cultivate spirituality in a great range of traditions, cosmologies and paradigms that may or may not include their connection to nature, celestial forces or the practitioners own inner transcendent nature. There is a common thread in what is characterised as sacred and spiritual.

Like many saints, masters and poets, we can contemplate such attributes as love, bliss, purpose, friendship, uplifted beauty transcendent and in nature and the sense of selfless service. Or we can delve directly into the most profound way we connect with the essence of existence and reality. Contemplating meaning in such moments helps us to align with a greater sense of goodness and connection in a living and friendly vast reality. Universal truth and being can be no less than the sum of all our most true and noble insights and experiences of life. It is also obviously much more. Personal or impersonal, a greater or pure consciousness beyond our sense of self is a subjective experience of vast potential just as love is.

The conviction or even the idea that the universe is living and conscious, is expressed inspiringly in Deepak Chopra and Menas Kafatos’ 2017 book “You are the Universe”. In this book they conclude with a theory of “qualia” which acknowledges ‘qualities’ of experience as fundamental to the observer and the observers existence and reality. Everything we can conceive and perceive is inescapably our own subjective view and experience, even through our man-made devices and equipment. ‘Quanta’ (the smallest sub-atomic unit) and Newtonian laws are discussed as two distinct levels or frameworks of laws and observations of the known material universe only, and so far short accounting fully for unanswered questions let alone the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of continued existence and experience. The ‘quantum’ realm particularly reveals the relative and surprising aspects of time, space and the interaction between the observer and reality itself.

Essentially, the book puts forward that our universe being random and stable from the big bang is against vast odds that would have it imploding or exploding, never forming even molecules if a vast array of variables of were even minutely different. Even more freakish is that such an unlikely random event evolved self-consciousness beings from only matter. Much is discussed along these lines drawing on known science theory and many new conclusions about how the universe formed. An existing but refreshed and interesting argument embracing science and philosophy is then presented that the universe arose and is still evolving from cosmic consciousness experiencing itself through a multi-dimensional universe of energy, matter and conscious beings.

Human unconditional love or compassion, self-less friendship and the vital essence of being alive is as much a part of the absolute and infinite consciousness as is our sense of profundity, divinity and sacredness. These are attributes experienced universally among all cultures, ages and people in many forms and guises. They are a few of many attributes of subjective reality and conscious awakening (becoming more aware of our ‘true’ nature) connecting us closer to a qualitative and subtle sense of universal consciousness. Conscious awakening is often associated with a realisation and identification with the observer of experience (experience including thoughts and feelings). The observer is unchanging pure consciousness compared to observed experience. With this shift of awareness comes a sense of presence, greater mindfulness in each moment. Identification with the observer gives a sense of blissfulness and freedom from physical and worldly attachments and aversions. It frees us from being at the effect of thoughts, feelings and experiences yet able to be present in them more fully.

The contemporary view of spirituality as quoted in the dictionary definition above, associates soul or spirit with a quality of being. It indicates a shared recognition in our society of a quality of consciousness or sense of being with soulfulness or spirit. This recognition is not intellectual or emotional yet is a subtle depth and quality of being widely accepted despite diverse beliefs about its meaning and implications.

Nonetheless, whatever one’s beliefs, personal spiritual experience transcends ideology and is arguably the domain that unites all true spiritual and religious paths but is not restricted to them. If ‘soul’ or ‘spirit’ are truly part of our true nature, then this level of ‘being’ is available to anyone and everyone. Buddhist and psychological approaches associate meditation in mindfulness or the pure conscious background to mind activity with bliss, wellbeing and enhanced levels of documented levels of consciousness.

Not only spiritual practices can cultivate a persons sensitivity and awareness on a ‘soul’ or ‘spirit’ dimension but so can lifestyle (choices of music, foods, environment) and social life (friends with whom one can share reflections and experiences ‘soul to soul’). In India, the term ‘sattvic’ is used to describe such harmonising and more spiritually aligned influences and vibrations.

Spiritual experience transcends thought and beliefs. Beliefs may determine what we make of it, and like meditation even pave the way for a clear personal experience and conscious shift. However, the experience freed of interpretation and mental-narrative is where many spiritual practitioners aim to immerse themselves when in communion or meditation, or through prayer, then eventually attain it continuously. It is possibly what Christ referred to as approaching God like a child. Opening ourselves to feeling close to a greater universal presence or consciousness, albeit through glimpses and intuitive knowing, is a mark of progressive spirituality.

So to, is the recognition that it is a shared and existential nature we all share. Pure spirit or pure consciousness at a spiritual level can provide an authentic sense of brother-hood and sister-hood. It is a real transcendent nature, consciousness of the pure subjective experience beyond all human doctrines and beliefs. As more people recognise the essence of a living personal spiritual experience holds a truth and absoluteness that cannot be contained by our unique and conditioned interpretations and beliefs we can respect differences in ideologies yet know when we are aligning in the same essence and reality.

Progressive spiritual attributes are also indicated by enhanced appreciation of beauty and goodness underlying the negatives and positives of worldly appearances. A universal theme in spiritual and religious practices is living from values of love and compassion, support and service to others, and removing ones self from purely selfish desires.

The bottom line universally is that of harmonising ones self and as a society by cultivating the primary drive of intent and action from love or compassion.

The dictionary view above connects “quality of being” with attributes of “soul” or “spirit”. Based on the discussion above, spirituality, as concerned with ‘spirit’ and ‘soul’, can be extended to being concerned with ‘consciousness, life and energy’. Distinguishing it as “opposed” to anything concerned with “material and physical things” may be an old distinction. I would suggest spirituality is concerned with realities beyond ‘purely material and physical things’ yet inclusive of physicality. To the spiritually awakened, all things are spiritual. To the spiritually deprived, nothing is spiritual.

Thus ‘spirituality’ represents a holistic and contextual knowledge and understanding of existence and life.

Crisis can also harness an instinctive need to develop our sense of ‘the whole’, so spirituality out of necessity can develop as we collectively gain greater maturity and knowledge as a global society, along with the issues that we have created.

From contemplating the big bang and the ensuing universe to each and every daily action, can we attune to the wholeness and profoundness of conscious existence – something coming from nothing and, nothing we can grasp with the intellect, mysteriously being behind everything. We must re-attune ourselves beyond material wonders and distractions to that which is soulfully known and felt without form. In this way we can redefine the simple presence of consciousness practically. We can rediscover humility, wonder and a sense of sacredness towards the power, profoundness and infinite potential which is our gift of life and consciousness. Being authentic with this as part of the art of being more fully ourselves, we find our own pathway through our unique life and practices. Connecting beyond our conditioned ideas of self to Divine Mother or Father can still be a high and powerful concept during such intimate and personal moments of insight, awareness and revelation.

Key Points

  1. Religion and Spirituality are not the same thing.

  2. A spiritual universe is a living conscious universe.

  3. Universal consciousness is no less than the most noble attributes of human nature.

  4. Spiritual practices, lifestyle and social factors can cultivate values, spiritual meanings, communion or alignment towards a transcendent or cosmic consciousness.

  5. Nearness to the presence or sense of a higher presence or universal consciousness is indicative of spiritual experience as is recognising it.

  6. Enhanced appreciation of beauty, goodness, truth and meaning come with spiritual awakening.

  7. Engaging in higher values through support and service to others, especially through love or compassion is central to spirituality.

  8. Unification of mind and soul tis through a sense of universal love.

  9. Our inner nature and global circumstances combine to create greater tension, prompting many to instinctively attune more to their spiritual personal nature and shared well being with others.

  10. Identifying with our sense of spiritual connection authentically and beyond our own conditioned thoughts and habits can provide the basis for our inner practice.